• They don’t have time. They think they have no time for knowledge sharing.
  • They don’t trust others. They are worried that sharing their knowledge will allow other people to be rewarded without giving credit or something in return, or will result in the misuse of that knowledge.
  • They think that knowledge is power. They hoard their knowledge waiting for someone to beg them for it, treat them like a guru, or give them something in return.
  • They don’t know why they should do it. They don’t think they need to spend time on knowledge sharing. Leadership has not made a strong case for knowledge sharing.
  • There is no positive consequence to them for doing it. They receive no rewards, recognition, promotions, or other benefits for sharing knowledge.
  • They think they are doing it. They are sharing knowledge differently than the recommended ways (e.g., sending email to trusted colleagues or distribution lists).

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Stan Garfield

Stan Garfield

Knowledge Management Author and Speaker, Founder of SIKM Leaders Community, Community Evangelist, Knowledge Manager https://sites.google.com/site/stangarfield/